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Facebook + Journalism 101Facebook + Journalism 101 Academia could be more social. So recently, I setup a Facebook Group for "Social Journalism Educators" to be able to connect and share resources around how they are teaching...

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My Next Chapter: Facebook JournalismMy Next Chapter: Facebook Journalism This was originally posted on my Facebook Page. Also, read CNN's coverage of my new role. ------ I am honored to announce that I will be joining Facebook as Journalist...

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Is Sharing More Valuable for Publishers on Facebook or Twitter? [STATS] Is Sharing More Valuable for Publishers on Facebook... This is an excerpt of analysis I recently wrote on Mashable about how our Twitter users interact with our content vs. those on Facebook. The result: Facebook's click-per-share...

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Facebook & Its Growing Role in Social JournalismFacebook & Its Growing Role in Social Journalism This is an excerpt from a post I recently reported for Mashable.com. Read the full piece here. A Facebook-only news organization? It was only a matter of time. The...

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New to Twitter? Here Are 12 Tips From the CommunityNew to Twitter? Here Are 12 Tips From the Community For someone just starting out on Twitter, the social information network can be intimidating. It has its own language, limitations, and features that are very unique to the...

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Vadim Lavrusik Rss

Subscribe for Journalists

Posted on : 14-09-2011 | By : Vadim Lavrusik | In : Facebook, Online Journalism

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Subscribe is a simple way to broaden your conversation on Facebook with your community of readers and viewers, while reserving personal updates for people you know well. Your audience can keep up with your content without having to add you as a friend. They can simply subscribe. You can have an unlimited number of subscribers, and easily update them on-the-go from your mobile phone.
You can also subscribe to sources or other journalists to get their updates in your News Feed to keep up with the latest news. Also, with each individual you can customize what kind of updates you get from them in your News Feed.

You can enable readers to subscribe to you by going to the Subscriptions tab on the left-hand side of your profile, or by going to facebook.com/about/subscriptions. Simply click Allow Subscribers to enable your readers and viewers to subscribe to your public updates. Download the PDF guide below:
Subscribe for Journalists

Also, feel free to subscribe to me at: https://www.facebook.com/vadim

My Next Chapter: Facebook Journalism

Posted on : 14-04-2011 | By : Vadim Lavrusik | In : Facebook, Social Media

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This was originally posted on my Facebook Page. Also, read CNN’s coverage of my new role.

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I am honored to announce that I will be joining Facebook as Journalist Program Manager to lead the charge of growing and improving social journalism on the platform.

I am going to miss my brilliant colleagues at Mashable. In the next few weeks, I will transition out of my role as Community Manager & Social Media Strategist, where I led the growing community team and managed the strategy behind Mashable’s distributed social presence on and off site. From launching the first ever Social Media Day to working on the social integration of Follow, a new social product from Mashable, it’s been an extraordinary experience. Most of all, I’ve loved covering the social journalism space and will continue to do so in my new role, helping journalism utilize the social web to improve their reporting.

As Journalist Program Manager, I will be leading the charge to build programs that help journalists utilize Facebook in their reporting while advocating on their behalf to improve social journalism on the platform. This includes the likes of the recently launched Journalists on Facebook Page and Facebook Journalism Meetups program, as well as resources for journalism educators, but also taking insightful feedback to product on how Facebook can be improved for journalism. I will be based in Facebook’s NYC office.

Facebook’s role in journalism has grown tremendously, perhaps showcased during the recent unrest in North Africa and the Middle East, and the growth is only going to continue as new products on the platform are introduced and users become even more accustomed to engaging with content and its producers. While some have proclaimed and lamented the death of journalism, I’ve been more fascinated with how it’s evolving, especially the emergence of social journalism. And though the platform or format may change, storytelling is thriving. After all, journalism isn’t dying. It’s being reborn.

I’m excited to work with journalists to enhance how Facebook is utilized for reporting and storytelling, and share the quality journalism taking place on the platform. Our first Facebook Journalism meetup will be on April 27th at Facebook headquarters in Palo Alto, California.

I look forward to working with you and would love to get your feedback and ideas. How are you utilizing Facebook in your reporting and storytelling? How can we help?

Is Sharing More Valuable for Publishers on Facebook or Twitter? [STATS]

Posted on : 25-03-2011 | By : Vadim Lavrusik | In : Facebook, Social Media, Twitter

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This is an excerpt of analysis I recently wrote on Mashable about how our Twitter users interact with our content vs. those on Facebook. The result: Facebook’s click-per-share ratio is better.

In the age of micropublishing, how many people are actually reading what you tweet or share on Facebook? And more importantly, how does the click-per-share ratio compare between the two very different social platforms that are utilized by millions of users every day for consuming and sharing content?

These are questions that keep social media strategists awake at night (or maybe just me). So at Mashable, we decided to take a look at our own data and see how user behavior compares between Facebook and Twitter, the two social media sites that generate the most referral traffic to Mashable.com.

After pulling three months worth of our social data and calculating the click-per-share (CPS), it appears that users on Twitter are more likely to share an article rather than read it, whereas users on Facebook click on more articles than they share. According to our social data, Twitter received roughly 0.38 clicks per tweet, whereas Facebook received 3.31 clicks per engagement (the number of times people posted a Mashable link to Facebook through an action on a social plugin or through a Wall post). This would mean that a Facebook action gets roughly 8.7x more clicks than a tweet.

Read the full article at Mashable.com

Facebook & Its Growing Role in Social Journalism

Posted on : 04-03-2011 | By : Vadim Lavrusik | In : Facebook, Social Media

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This is an excerpt from a post I recently reported for Mashable.com. Read the full piece here.

A Facebook-only news organization? It was only a matter of time.

The Rockville Central, a community news site in the Washington, D.C., area, will move all its operations and news coverage to its Facebook Page starting on March 1. This risky move by the site’s editor, Cindy Cotte Griffiths, highlights Facebook’s growing role as a platform for journalists to use for social storytelling and reporting.

When it comes to journalists using social media, Twitter has been the go-to platform for real-time reporting and reaching out to sources, largely because it’s a public platform and most of its content is accessible. But with Facebook continuing to scale and in some ways becoming more public, it offers journalists an arsenal of content types beyond 140 characters and an alternative destination to connect with new sources of information.

So Facebook is everywhere? Well, its content needs some context

Posted on : 28-04-2010 | By : Vadim Lavrusik | In : Facebook, Social Media

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Facebook has a problem: displaying user activity in a non-contextual way. Right now your recent activity displays on your wall whether you like it or not. For some people this causes dating problems, and others they simply take in bite-sized information about their friends friending so-and-so or “liking” this and that story without any contextual information as to why.

And now this interaction is available with content across the Web, such as liking or commenting on articles — something that news organizations like CNN and Washington Post have jumped on. The problem is the content lacks context. Similar to how Jay Rosen talks about news online needing context for us to better digest it, social media does as well.

Facebook needs a “social nut graph” – a way for users to provide their friends with contextual information about their recent activity. Something that is an optional way for users to include a bite-sized piece of information along with any activity before it is published. Or it should change some of the language in recommending posts, such as killing the “like” and using something more specific such as “recommend.” If we are truly in “the age of Facbeook,” then the social giant needs to do a better job of allowing us to creating contextual content.

CNN.com shows glimpse of Facebook’s new connectivity features (PICS)

Posted on : 21-04-2010 | By : Vadim Lavrusik | In : Facebook, Social Media

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Facebook is announcing many of its new features today, and some news organizations are wasting no time in integrating and testing them. Nieman Lab reported that Washington Post has integrated Facebook in a new tool that let’s users see how their friends have interacted with a story. It is part of Facebook’s latest push to be connected and integrated throughout the Web in a way beyond what Facebook Connect allowed.

A killer feature Facebook needs now: Video Chat

Posted on : 26-03-2010 | By : Vadim Lavrusik | In : Facebook, Social Media, Video

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Facebook is quickly becoming the primary social communication channel in our everyday lives. Yes, primary. We spend much more time obsessively interacting with people on Facebook than we do by phone and for some a life-line. I think that they could take it one step further by implementing video chat capability — a functionality that has garnered 521 million users for Skype (not the only reason for its success). Apparently last year Facebook began to include hints in its code that it may be implementing such a feature, but no news of it has been released since.

ReadWriteWeb has a great piece about the social needs that Chatroulette — the video chat site that pairs people randomly — fills for users: the craving for peeking, face-to-face online, control, and the “no commitment effect.” I want to focus on the need for face-to-face communication with people.

I don’t have the numbers for this, and if you have them I would love to see them, but anecdotally I have a lot of friends that are growing discontent with social networking starting to feel impersonal or detached, at least when it comes to conversations and chats on Facebook. Short, brief blurts of conversation back and forth with friends or family. Waiting for the slow reply as their friends multi-task. The conversation can be disjointed. This experience is of course does not represent a majority of the people out there, and I don’t really mind my experience on Facebook chat (or other chat service), but I can still empathize.

More people want a face-to-face communication, especially with family members who are far away. The default right now is Skype, but not everyone has the service, and some people use Google Chat’s video feature. Again, not everyone has a G-mail account. Imagine if Facebook had an option for you to chat with friend using a video chat feature.

Next, this could be integrated into its mobile application, allowing you to chat and communicate with friends on-the-go (of course this would require phones with two video screens). Not sure if the folks at Facebook are working on this already, but I sure hope they are at least thinking about it. Would love your thoughts on this. Here is an example of what it would look like (taken from Facebook chat and G-Chat and meshed together):

So what say you Mark Zuckerberg?

Why Facebook’s Privacy Changes are Detrimental to Users

Posted on : 12-01-2010 | By : Vadim Lavrusik | In : Facebook, Social Media

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Excerpt from a Mashable post that ran today:

facebook privacy imageThough Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg says that public is the new “social norm,” many members who use the social network for professional and business reasons have lost the ability to conduct certain actions privately as a result of changes made to the settings.

And despite this being a reflection and a catalyst of our social activities becoming more public through the likes of Twitter (Twitter) and other sites, not having the option to control certain aspects in some ways is detrimental to the way we use the site and has the potential to deter users from using the site freely.

Research: Social media publications may have advantage over traditional news sites

Posted on : 06-10-2009 | By : Vadim Lavrusik | In : Facebook, Higher Education, Social Media

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faceboookdailyUniversity of Minnesota researcher Christine Greenhow and her team released their findings based on analytics of interaction with The Minnesota Daily Facebook Application today. For those new to the project, it was a Knight Foundation funded application built by NewsCloud in collaboration with The Minnesota Daily, a college paper I was editor of last year. This wasn’t the only application built by NewsCloud, but one that focused on a niche geographic area and topic: news and issues surrounding the University of Minnesota community.

Some of the key findings are echoed in a recent post by Steve Rubel who wrote a post about the next great media company won’t have a website, but will likely be an application or some form of publication directly on a social site. The key things that stand out to me is that the Facebook application was not only able to attract “influentials” to engage and participate but that “as a vehicle to express opinions, stay informed, and connect with a local community, social media publications like The Daily may have an advantage over traditional news sites.” The best part is that this source code for the apps is open.

If you’re interested in the research, check out the full summary of the findings here (PDF). The data backing these findings up will be released later. Or here is an excerpt below:

Key Findings

1. Correlations between visits to social network sites and visits to news Web sites, as well as other online behaviors, suggest the potential of integrating applications like The Daily into young people’s online social networking routines.

2. As a vehicle to express opinions, stay informed, and connect with a local community, social media publications like The Daily may have an advantage over traditional news sites.

3. Interest in The Daily application’s focal topic — University of Minnesota community issues — increased. Daily users mostly used the application for what it was intended, namely, to engage them in campus-related issues.

4. The Daily application attracted a base of users who were already active in the community. The profile for these users and the high rate of viral invites, suggest that social media publications such as The Daily might not only attract “influentials,” but that these highly connected individuals will also invite their friends.

5. Examination of digital literacy practices reveals Daily users engaged in scanning stories rather than reading in full. Users participated in a range of non-school online reading and writing activities via social network sites, suggesting the potential for future applications.

Advanced Facebook for Journalists

Posted on : 18-09-2009 | By : Vadim Lavrusik | In : Facebook, Journalism school

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Sree Sreenivasan, my dean of student affairs and professor of digital media at the Columbia School of Journalism,  organized some great guests for a webcast today on how journalists can use Facebook. In fact, the Journalism School is teaching how to use Facebook as a tool for journalists, among other social media. The panel included:

Below is the webcast via Blogtalkradio. And also here is a short post from Ben Parr briefly mentioning what the conversation was about (why journalists should use Facebook, the new features, etc.):